Censorship and Free Expression

As the supporters of gender self-identification have declared, a person has rights to ask others even if the government to ignore his or her sex; also, this person can ask them to recognize him or her gender identity. However, if someone refuses to do so, especially for a female, she will be called as “TERF 1” and be attacked by trans rights activists, verbally or physically.

Globally, a number of governments, public institutions, and NGOs are trying to force people to recognize and refer to individuals based on their “gender identity”. Meanwhile, those who tend to believe one’s sex rather than gender identity will be facing backlashes such as cancel culture.

  1. TERF : Stands for ‘trans exclusionary radical feminist’ but is used to label anyone who questions, disagrees with or challenges any part of trans ideology in order to dismiss their views as unworthy of consideration.
    Source ↩︎


Taiwan

TTHA
Febuary, 2021

TTHA has suggested Taiwan’s media that in their news reports trans people’s gender self-identification should be respected no matter how controversial the related events are.

Source: TTHA’s Official Website
TAPCPR
July, 2021

For Ms. Yang’s lawsuit, Taiwan Alliance to Promote Civil Partnership Rights (TAPCPR) has emphasized that Ms. Yang is a woman—despite the fact that she neither receives sex reassignment surgery nor changes her ID card. Further, it has accused Taiwan’s media that their misgendering of Ms. Yang as “Mr. Yang” is an implication suggesting to reinforce the public’s wrong impression that “the person is a male”. In its conclusion, those pieces of news would make it harder for Ms. Yang to win the public’s approval for her need for using the company’s female restroom.

TAPCPR has accused Taiwan’s media that their misgendering of Ms. Yang as “Mr. Yang” is an implication suggesting to reinforce the public’s wrong impression that “the person is a male”.
Source: Post on Facebook
TAPCPR’s comparison of two media’s different references to Yang.
Source: Post on Facebook
TAPCPR
October, 2021

On 16 Oct. 2021, TAPCPR has held an open conference about Xiao E and Taiwan’s GRA. Some people complained that they did not get the notification after sending out the application even though TAPCPR’s general secretary (Zhi-Jie Jian) explained that every application was granted. When one of the attendants shared the recording, TAPCPR restated it as a private conference. On its Facebook fan page, its general secretary (Zhi-Jie Jian) and lawyer (Xiu-Wen Xu) threatened to sue that attendant unless the recording was removed from the internet.


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